March WordFest explores grief and loss through prose and poetry

Ed Putka

Retired judge and short story writer Ed Putka hosts the March WordFest next Tuesday, March 12, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Throughout the centuries, grief and personal loss have found expression and healing through prose and poetry. Two local writers will be sharing their unique personal experiences of this universal human condition.

Beverlee Ruhland

Beverlee Ruhland has lived in Clatskanie for the last 40 years where she raised a family and enjoyed many adventures with Howard, her husband of 50 years. When he died in 2015, Beverlee fell into bouts of deep depression. Possessing a Masters degree in biology, she had worked as an environmental manager for various firms, where her writing was technical and scientific. With Howard’s death, her writing turned inward, and she began keeping a “grief journal,” writing out her grief through memoirs and poetry (“Or what passes for poetry to me,” she says.) Sharing from these writings is a further step in her healing,

Diane Searing

Diane Searing’s husband, Jan, passed away unexpectedly 11 months ago. “Suddenly, my life was thrown on a whole new course,” she says. “I have spent much of this last year writing about this new journey alone.” Diane has been writing since childhood. Her articles have been published in the Oregonian, Women’s World Magazine, and Sisters International Magazine.  Jan had encouraged her to fulfill her dream of going to college and pursuing her writing. She graduated from Linfield College in 1999, and continued with post graduate courses in Expressive Arts Theory at Marylhurst University. Diane is hoping her writing will become a book helpful for others who “are walking this difficult path, trying to cope through this transition.”

PJ Peterson

Turning from grief and sadness to humor and mystery, PJ Peterson will read from her first novel, Blind Fish Don’t Talk, where physician Julia Fairchild has gotten away for a vacation on the beautiful island of St. Maarten. However, her plans for a week of sun, sand, reading, and scuba-diving are interrupted by the accidental death of an experienced scuba diver.  But was it an accident? Julia’s determination to learn the truth leads her on a dangerous path where she finds more questions than answers.

PJ has been preparing for this second career as a writer since childhood.  A voracious reader throughout her life, she penned winning entries for the medical journal Medical Economics, while practicing in her primary career as an Internal Medicine specialist, including “Don’t dismiss patients’ near-death experiences,” and “The patient who gave me flowers—every day for years.”

PJ is now writing her second novel (working title: “Rembrandt Rides a Bike”) where Dr. Julia Fairchild returns in a fun romp along the Rhine River. PJ also enjoys writing short stories, especially for her great-nieces and -nephews, tailoring each story to the child, and always ending with a life lesson.  Someday she will publish those stories for other children.

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www. Alan-rose.com.

February WordFest features two new novels set in the Pacific Northwest

Two new novels explore different moments in history at WordFest next Tuesday, February 12, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Julia Stoops

One of the more recent books published by Portland’s Forest Avenue Press, Julia Stoops’ Parts Per Million is a tale of civic activism, loss and transformation during the buildup to the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq. Three Portland media activists are working to save the world—one radio show at a time—when an Irish photographer with an expired visa and a messy past, disrupts their lives. As the scrappy crew takes to the streets, reporting on anti-war protests and the explosive political climate, they uncover the biggest scoop of their careers, involving corrupt war technology research at a prominent Oregon university.

Julia Stoops was born in Samoa, growing up in Japan, Australia, New Zealand and Washington, D.C., and has lived in Portland since 1994. Parts per Million, shaped by her experiences in community radio journalism and anti-war activism, was shortlisted for the PEN Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction. A visual artist as well as a writer, Julia is a recipient of Oregon Arts Commission Fellowships for visual arts and literature, and was a resident at the Ucross Foundation in 2016. Her current activist work is in the digital privacy movement.

Lilly Robbins Brock

WordFest regular Lilly Robbins Brock will read from Intrepid Journey: An Untamed Frontier, the first book in Lilly’s Intrepid Journey series set in the 1850s of the Pacific Northwest. When an opportunity opens up to travel to the dangerous but promising Northwest frontier, Thomas Bennett and his reluctant wife, Jane, prepare for their respective journeys. Thomas and his brothers will pave the way on a paddle wheel steamship traveling around South America, while Jane and the children are to follow twelve months later on the shorter Nicaragua route. But nothing has prepared them for the long separation and their life-changing adventures. They must rely on each other for the courage demanded by their journeys and arrival in a largely lawless, unforgiving land.

Lilly’s previous books were nonfiction, Wooden Boats and Iron Men, about men who served on PT boats in World War II, and Victory on the Home Front: While Her Husband Fought, She Built Planes ~ She was a Rosie the Riveter, focusing on strong women who served at home. Lilly’s preferred genre is historical fiction but she has also written and published Food Gifts Recipes from Nature’s Bountybased on organic gardening.

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www.alan-rose.com.

January WordFest welcomes 2019 with prose and poetry

WordFest celebrates the new year’s arrival with local prose and poetry next Tuesday, January 8, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

David Martin will be reading from the final volume in his six-book series, The Adventures of Sugar Dog. Written for middle grade and older readers, the series is about 12-year-old Jimmy Baker and his dog who, along with Jimmy’s three friends, embark on a number of mysteries during the summer between sixth and seventh grade.  The new book, Twilight and Tomorrow,  takes place six years later when Jimmy is graduating from high school and Sugar Dog is old and growing more and more feeble. 

David’s radio voice may be familiar to many who listen to KLOG, KUKN and The Wave. In radio broadcasting for many years, he has also worked for KGON, KPAM, KXL as well as other stations in the Portland metropolitan area. A singer and songwriter as well as author, David has recently written a western under the pen name Dusty Dawkins, titled Six Feet Under.

WordFest regular Caleigh Maffett reads from her fantasy novel in progress, Artorious, Selected. Artorious is a fifteen-year-old boy marked by the Folke to contain their king of kings, Lord Aether. A year prior, he was involved in an incident regarding Aether that made him the Number One Most Wanted in Faroque. Toran Kaelpie, a bounty hunter, finds Artorious while he’s escaping local law enforcement. Sick, tired, and constantly on the run, Artorious doesn’t have time or the trust to get involved with other people. Not that it’s going to stop Toran and his sister Lillian from stepping in anyway.


Caleigh is a junior at university, planning to go into editing. She has been published in Metamorphose under her pen name and was an editor on the 2018 Salal Review, Lower Columbia College’s award winning literary and visual arts magazine.


Kaden Moeller
will be reading from his poetry collection, The Color That You See, which he describes as “an act of both bereavement for my lovely San Juan dog Mara and something for my Mother to read when she got back from her three jobs.”  He describes it as “a poetic picture of the early twentieth first century, much like Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass is a poetic picture of the 19th.”

Born in Kirkland, Washington, Kaden moved to South Florida at the age of five, then back to Washington, and Longview, when he was twenty eight. His first poems and short stories were published in his high school creative writing magazine, The Tail Spinner, back in Florida.

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www. Alan-rose.com.

December WordFest celebrates National Novel Writing Month

Aspiring novelists who took the writing challenge in November will read from their works at the next WordFest on Tuesday, December 4, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview. (Note: WordFest occurs on the first Tuesday in December.)

During National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), people across the country commit to writing a novel of approximately 30,000 words in 30 days. Even if they don’t achieve their goal, many writers have used this as a way to start the novel that has been gestating in their mind.

Vikki J. Carter will host the event where local NaNoWriMo participants will introduce and read from their projects. Vikki is the producer of Authors of the Pacific Northwest, a weekly podcast for writers who are interested in learning how to be successful in the publishing industry.  Her company, SquishPen Productions, focuses on helping writers learn tips of the trade from published authors so they too can succeed in a competitive field.

Vikki has two books in the works, the first is part of a series set in Elizabethan era England and the clashing world of a woman’s choice for love.  The second novel follows  a young couple’s chaotic relationship as they struggle with the not-so-glamorous pursuit of fame in the world of rock-n-roll. You can learn more about SquishPen Productions at www.squishpen.com

 

 

Lorraine Merrin will be highlighting the poetry of David Lee, Utah’s first poet laureate. Lee captures small town America with affection and humor and an ear for truth within the vernacular. He has been called “the pig poet,” and may be best known for his collection of poems, The Porcine Canticles.   He has won numerous awards and holds a PhD with a concentration on the poetry of John Milton.

Lorraine’s poetry has been published in Rattle, Thema, Time of Singing, and other literary magazines, two anthologies, and in her own collection, Holding Tight To Gravity’s Tail.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www. Alan-rose.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naturalist Robert Michael Pyle reads from his first novel at November WordFest

 

Robert Michael Pyle

Ever popular Bob Pyle returns to WordFest to discuss and read from his first novel, Magdalena Mountain, on Tuesday, November 13, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Bob​ is the author of nineteen  books, including WintergreenRambles in a Ravaged LandChasing MonarchsWhere Bigfoot Walks, Sky Time in Grays River, and a poetry collection Evolution of the Genus Iris. A Yale-trained ecologist and Guggenheim fellow, he is a full-time writer living in Wahkiakum County.

 

With Magdalena Mountain, he shows he’s at home in an imagined landscape as much as in the natural one. At the center of this story of majesty and high mountain magic are three Magdalenas— Mary, a woman whose uncertain journey opens the book; Magdalena Mountain, shrouded in mystery and menace; and the all-black Magdalena alpine butterfly, the most elusive of several rare and beautiful species found on the mountain. In the Colorado Rocky Mountain wilderness lives the enigmatic Oberon, a reluctant de facto leader of the Grove, a diverse community of monks who share a devotion to nature. Converging in the same wilderness are October Carson, a beachcomber-wanderer in pursuit of the alpine butterflies he collects for museums; James Mead, a young graduate student intent upon learning the ecology of this seductive creature; and Mary Glanville, who also seeks the butterfly but can’t remember why. While the mystery surrounding Mary takes a menacing turn, their shared quest pulls them deeper into the high mountain wilderness, culminating in a harrowing encounter on the stony slopes of Magdalena Mountain

 

Copies of the novel as well as Bob’s other books will be available for sale and signing at WordFest.

 

Longview poet and memoirist Mary Lyons will read from her developing anthology titled Body Parts. One of our most popular presenters, Mary has shared funny and bizarre experiences in “An Affair of The Heart,” shedding light on how modern technology intersects with the human heart, and “Clowning around,” a hilarious account of her experience performing as a clown for children. On Tuesday, Mary will be reading her essays, “Foot By Foot” and “Old Blue Eyes.”

 

 

 

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www.Alan-Rose.com.

 

 

 

 

At October WordFest murder and humor, she wrote

Humorist Jan Bono returns to WordFest with the third book in her Sylvia Avery Mystery Series on Tuesday, October 9, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Crab Bait, like the two earlier novels, Bottom Feeders and Starfish, is set on the Long Beach Peninsula.  In the new mystery, the Merry Widows of the North Beach Peninsula may be just a tad too merry. They’ve formed a geriatric belly dancing troupe, The Veiled Rainbow, and are having the time of their lives spending the insurance money they received when their respective husbands died, deaths that all happened under mysterious circumstances. Meredith Avery, Sylvia’s mother, a three-time widow herself, has been instrumental in helping these women take out hefty life insurance policies on their spouses shortly before their deaths. What else might Meredith have led them to do?

“My mystery books are cozies,” says Jan, “and cozy mysteries are a very specific genre. They have no graphic violence, no obscene language, and no explicit sex scenes. What they do have is an amateur sleuth who works with the local police department in a small town to solve crimes. There’s a quirky cast of characters, and lots of humor.”

Jan has lived in Long Beach, Washington, since 1977. She began writing a humorous, personal experience newspaper column that continued for 10 years, garnering 11 state awards from the WNPA. Her column’s popularity led her to become one of the top five contributing authors to the “Chicken Soup for the Soul” series, publishing 36 stories during the past 8 years.

In 2012, Jan became the Grand Prize winner of the Coast Weekend serial mystery chapter contest. This inspired her to begin writing her lighthearted and fun cozy mystery series, which she describes as “like Murder She Wrote, but with a lot more humor.”

Jan has also written five collections of humorous short stories, two poetry chapbooks, one collection of short romances, a book about her 252-pound weight-loss journey, and nine one-act plays. She has been published in numerous magazines, including Guidepost, Star, and Woman’s World.

Copies of the three mysteries will be available for sale and signing at WordFest.

 

 

Mason Loika will be reading a selection of his poetry, including the song “The Spin We’re In,” recorded in 2004.  In addition, he will read from a story he wrote for the Bucks County Herald, and a short story entitled “Phantom of the Night.”

Mason has written as a reporter for the Miami News, the Miami Herald, and the Bucks County Herald, covering entertainment in radio, television, movies and music. He also wrote the nonfiction Gulag to Rhapsody: A Survivor’s Journey (2012) about a former prisoner-of-war who survived 2½ years in the same Soviet gulag that later imprisoned Russian dissident Alexander Solzhenitzen.

Mason recently moved to Longview from Bucks County, Pennsylvania, where he wrote reviews of live concerts for such artists as the Marshall Tucker Band, Heart, and Norah Jones, as well as local bands.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www. Alan-rose.com.

 

 

 

 

 

September WordFest begins fall season with two taut tales of suspense

Following its summer break, WordFest’s monthly series of readings resumes on Tuesday, September 11, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 

R.A. Long High School graduate Jon Gosch will read from his newest novel, Deep Fire Risea murder mystery set in southwest Washington at the time of the Mount St. Helens eruption.  Patrolling the backwoods country around the rumbling volcano, Deputy Sheriff Tom Wilson discovers a brutal murder. His hunt to find the murderer will take him into the red zone on the morning of May 18, 1980.The book was edited by Jon’s former teacher Jim LeMonds and friend Spike Walker. Naturalist, poet and now-novelist Robert Michael Pyle has praised the book, saying, “The greatest geological event of our times finally has the novel it deserves.”

Jon graduated from the University of Washington in Seattle where he studied Creative Writing and Journalism. A lifelong hunter and conservationist, he began investigating elk hoof disease in 2014.  His articles and photographs on the subject have appeared in regional and national publications, and he recently received an award from the Outdoor Writers Association of America. Jon now lives in Spokane where he is a freelance book editor and working on a novel about the Wobblies.

 

You can read The Columbia River Reader’s review of Deep Fire Rise here.

 

 

 

 

Adeline Alda will read from her memoir, The Rapist’s Girlfriend. She and her partner, Cole, were living on a boat at a marina in Portland, Oregon, when a woman from a neighboring boat accused Cole of rape. Cole had Dissociative Identity Disorder and experienced multiple selves ranging in age from an infant to an elderly adult. Adeline, who lived with all of these selves, knew none to be a rapist, and helped Cole defend himself (or him-selves), embarking with him on an emotional, spiritual, and psychological journey.

 

 

 

A past board member of the Washington Poets Association, Adeline’s poetry has appeared in print and online under various versions of her name. Her poetry has been performed by actors at the Milagro Theater in Portland, featured on Northwest Public Radio, and set to music by two songwriters. She currently resides in Olympia. The Rapist’s Girlfriend is her first work of prose.

 

 

 

 

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last WordFest event before August break

A variety of literary forms will be presented at the next WordFest on Tuesday, July 10, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 

William L. Alton earned a BA and MFA in Creative Writing from Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. He has published a novel, Flesh and Bone (2015), two collections of poetry, Heroes of Silence and Heat Washes Through, a memoir titled My Name is Bill and Girls, a collection of flash fiction. His work has appeared in a number of publications, and in 2010, he was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Bill’s newest novel was launched in June 2018. In Comfortable Madness, Butter is a teenaged lesbian who lives with schizophrenia. She hallucinates and does the best she can with the help of a few close friends and her girlfriend. But then Gid begins to visit. No one can see him except Butter. In his visits, his face is obscured. No one believes he is real, not even after Butter becomes pregnant. Gid tells Butter that she will be the mother of a savior. Finally, Butter forces Gid to show his face. When he does, he also disappears, and Butter comes back to the world she lived in before Gid, a world of voices and visions, but also a world of hope with a new baby to raise.

 

 

 

 

 

Lorna Moon will be reading from the her historical fiction novel, Jacob’s Pillow  (2006 Thumb Print Press, Edinburgh), where folklore and gothic adventure bring the legend of Thomas the Rhymer to life as the otherworldly sage mentors young Alpin, a reluctant hero, on his quest to save Scotland. Donald Smith, PhD, of the Scottish Storytelling Centre called it, “A beautiful piece of storytelling, finely wrought and structured and full of life, passion, and mystery.”

Lorna spent eight years living and writing in Scotland. She now lives in Centralia, Washington.

 

 

 

Fredrick Hudgin will be reading his newest short story, about a man who is dying of cancer and about to enter hospice. His cat, his companion for twelve years, is unable to go with him, so the man tries to find a way for his cat to live with people who will care for him.

“It’s Up to the Cat” is included in Fred’s collection of short stories, A Rainy Night and Other Short Stories.

 

Fred has been writing poetry and short stories since he took a Creative Writing class at Purdue University in 1967. “Unfortunately, that was the only class I passed, and I spent the next three years in the army, including a tour in Vietnam.” He earned a BS in Computer Science from Rutgers University, leading to a career as a computer programmer. His short stories and poems have been published in Biker Magazine, on Poetry.Com, The Salal Review, The Scribbler, and in the WordFest anthology, That Holiday Feeling.

 

Signed copies of the presenters’ books will be available for sale that evening.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www. Alan-rose.com.

 

 

 

 

 

June WordFest features a poet, a playwright, and a novelist

A variety of literary forms will be presented at the next WordFest on Tuesday, June 12, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 Poet Janice Haupt will be reading from her most recent book of poems, Searching for Water. She describes the collection as “a journey through my lifetime.” In it, she writes of special people she has encountered, including “bums by the Cowlitz River,” meeting bears in the blueberries, and climbing Mt. Cotopaxi in Ecuador with her grandson. “Wherever I am, there’ll be water calling to me.”

 

Janice has published several collections of her poetry including, Call This Beach Mine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leslie Slape will read selections from her play, The Harder Courage, a finalist out of 400 submissions in the Ashland New Plays Festival. By the evening of WordFest, she should know if her play is one of the four winners. The Harder Courage is a historical drama based on true events in Woodland and Kalama in the 1890s. It explores the relationship between Sheriff Ben Holmes and his prisoner, Robert Day, whom Holmes is ultimately required to hang for murder.

Leslie is a retired Daily News reporter and a professional storyteller. In addition to plays, she writes short fiction, memoir, historical pieces, and stories in the style of folktales. Her story, “The Tale-Teller,” was published in The Healing Heart: Families (2003, New Society Publishers). Her work has also appeared in the Cowlitz Historical Quarterly and the Salal Review.

Steve Anderson will be reading excerpts from his third Book of Hours novel (as yet untitled). Brother Alphaios and archivist Inaki Arriaga arrive in Rome for the presentation of the reconstructed Book of Hours to Pope Gregory II. That all-consuming task now complete, Alphaios has not yet been reassigned to his home monastery and is restrained by his vows from stepping outside the cloister into the city that so beguiles him. Will cloistered life still be sufficient for him?

 

 

Steve lives and writes in Longview.  His earlier two books in the series are The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios and Unholy Error. He is available to speak to book clubs upon request at (steve@jsandersonauthor.com)

 

 

 

 

Caleigh Maffet will be hosting the event that evening. A student at Lower Columbia College and staff member of the Kelso Public Library, Caleigh writes fantasy stories under the pseudonym, Alkaid Tsuki.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May WordFest celebrates women’s voices

Women writers who have been published in VoiceCatcher will be reading at the next WordFest on Tuesday, May 8, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 

VoiceCatcher is an online journal that supports, inspires, and empowers female-identified writers in the greater Portland, Oregon and Southwest Washington areas. Founded in 2006, VoiceCatcher made its place in the world with print anthologies, and then with an online edition beginning in 2012.

In 2016, VoiceCatcher released its 10th Anniversary Anthology, She Holds the Face of the WorldEdee Lemonier, who has read at WordFest previously, is the current president and will introduce the writers that evening, who include:

 

 

 

Joanna Rose, reading “Cooking Lessons,” which appeared in the Summer 2016 issue. Joanna has published stories, essays, poems, and the award-winning novel Little Miss Strange (Algonquin). Her work has appeared in CloudBankCream City ReviewWindfallTimberline ReviewPortland Review, and Zyzzyva, among others. Her essay “That Thing with Feathers,” was included in 2015 Best American Essays. She teaches youth through Literary Arts Writers in the Schools and Young Musicians & Artists, and co-hosts the Pinewood Table critique group.

 

 

 

Skye Edwards, whose piece “The Other F-Word”  appeared in the Fall 2017 issue, is a senior at Fort Vancouver High School. A feminist who believes equality should be a way of life, Skye has been writing since she was very young and hopes to make a difference in the world through her writing.

 

 

 

 

 

Kris Demien’s poem “Summer Calls My Name” also appeared in VoiceCatcher’s Fall 2017 issue. Now at the end of her seventh decade, Kris has more than a few high points to celebrate, among them: free-falling from 10,000 feet over Mt. Rainier, receiving a fellowship from the Library of Congress, and meeting Dizzy Gillespie. Currently, she is working on expanding her collection of rejection notices, and organizing creative, real life experiences for her four grandchildren.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public. 

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.