Last WordFest event before August break

A variety of literary forms will be presented at the next WordFest on Tuesday, July 10, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 

William L. Alton earned a BA and MFA in Creative Writing from Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. He has published a novel, Flesh and Bone (2015), two collections of poetry, Heroes of Silence and Heat Washes Through, a memoir titled My Name is Bill and Girls, a collection of flash fiction. His work has appeared in a number of publications, and in 2010, he was nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Bill’s newest novel was launched in June 2018. In Comfortable Madness, Butter is a teenaged lesbian who lives with schizophrenia. She hallucinates and does the best she can with the help of a few close friends and her girlfriend. But then Gid begins to visit. No one can see him except Butter. In his visits, his face is obscured. No one believes he is real, not even after Butter becomes pregnant. Gid tells Butter that she will be the mother of a savior. Finally, Butter forces Gid to show his face. When he does, he also disappears, and Butter comes back to the world she lived in before Gid, a world of voices and visions, but also a world of hope with a new baby to raise.

 

 

 

 

 

Lorna Moon will be reading from the her historical fiction novel, Jacob’s Pillow  (2006 Thumb Print Press, Edinburgh), where folklore and gothic adventure bring the legend of Thomas the Rhymer to life as the otherworldly sage mentors young Alpin, a reluctant hero, on his quest to save Scotland. Donald Smith, PhD, of the Scottish Storytelling Centre called it, “A beautiful piece of storytelling, finely wrought and structured and full of life, passion, and mystery.”

Lorna spent eight years living and writing in Scotland. She now lives in Centralia, Washington.

 

 

 

Fredrick Hudgin will be reading his newest short story, about a man who is dying of cancer and about to enter hospice. His cat, his companion for twelve years, is unable to go with him, so the man tries to find a way for his cat to live with people who will care for him.

“It’s Up to the Cat” is included in Fred’s collection of short stories, A Rainy Night and Other Short Stories.

 

Fred has been writing poetry and short stories since he took a Creative Writing class at Purdue University in 1967. “Unfortunately, that was the only class I passed, and I spent the next three years in the army, including a tour in Vietnam.” He earned a BS in Computer Science from Rutgers University, leading to a career as a computer programmer. His short stories and poems have been published in Biker Magazine, on Poetry.Com, The Salal Review, The Scribbler, and in the WordFest anthology, That Holiday Feeling.

 

Signed copies of the presenters’ books will be available for sale that evening.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

For more information, contact Alan Rose at www. Alan-rose.com.

 

 

 

 

 

June WordFest features a poet, a playwright, and a novelist

A variety of literary forms will be presented at the next WordFest on Tuesday, June 12, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 Poet Janice Haupt will be reading from her most recent book of poems, Searching for Water. She describes the collection as “a journey through my lifetime.” In it, she writes of special people she has encountered, including “bums by the Cowlitz River,” meeting bears in the blueberries, and climbing Mt. Cotopaxi in Ecuador with her grandson. “Wherever I am, there’ll be water calling to me.”

 

Janice has published several collections of her poetry including, Call This Beach Mine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leslie Slape will read selections from her play, The Harder Courage, a finalist out of 400 submissions in the Ashland New Plays Festival. By the evening of WordFest, she should know if her play is one of the four winners. The Harder Courage is a historical drama based on true events in Woodland and Kalama in the 1890s. It explores the relationship between Sheriff Ben Holmes and his prisoner, Robert Day, whom Holmes is ultimately required to hang for murder.

Leslie is a retired Daily News reporter and a professional storyteller. In addition to plays, she writes short fiction, memoir, historical pieces, and stories in the style of folktales. Her story, “The Tale-Teller,” was published in The Healing Heart: Families (2003, New Society Publishers). Her work has also appeared in the Cowlitz Historical Quarterly and the Salal Review.

Steve Anderson will be reading excerpts from his third Book of Hours novel (as yet untitled). Brother Alphaios and archivist Inaki Arriaga arrive in Rome for the presentation of the reconstructed Book of Hours to Pope Gregory II. That all-consuming task now complete, Alphaios has not yet been reassigned to his home monastery and is restrained by his vows from stepping outside the cloister into the city that so beguiles him. Will cloistered life still be sufficient for him?

 

 

Steve lives and writes in Longview.  His earlier two books in the series are The Beguilement of Brother Alphaios and Unholy Error. He is available to speak to book clubs upon request at (steve@jsandersonauthor.com)

 

 

 

 

Caleigh Maffet will be hosting the event that evening. A student at Lower Columbia College and staff member of the Kelso Public Library, Caleigh writes fantasy stories under the pseudonym, Alkaid Tsuki.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May WordFest celebrates women’s voices

Women writers who have been published in VoiceCatcher will be reading at the next WordFest on Tuesday, May 8, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 

VoiceCatcher is an online journal that supports, inspires, and empowers female-identified writers in the greater Portland, Oregon and Southwest Washington areas. Founded in 2006, VoiceCatcher made its place in the world with print anthologies, and then with an online edition beginning in 2012.

In 2016, VoiceCatcher released its 10th Anniversary Anthology, She Holds the Face of the WorldEdee Lemonier, who has read at WordFest previously, is the current president and will introduce the writers that evening, who include:

 

 

 

Joanna Rose, reading “Cooking Lessons,” which appeared in the Summer 2016 issue. Joanna has published stories, essays, poems, and the award-winning novel Little Miss Strange (Algonquin). Her work has appeared in CloudBankCream City ReviewWindfallTimberline ReviewPortland Review, and Zyzzyva, among others. Her essay “That Thing with Feathers,” was included in 2015 Best American Essays. She teaches youth through Literary Arts Writers in the Schools and Young Musicians & Artists, and co-hosts the Pinewood Table critique group.

 

 

 

Skye Edwards, whose piece “The Other F-Word”  appeared in the Fall 2017 issue, is a senior at Fort Vancouver High School. A feminist who believes equality should be a way of life, Skye has been writing since she was very young and hopes to make a difference in the world through her writing.

 

 

 

 

 

Kris Demien’s poem “Summer Calls My Name” also appeared in VoiceCatcher’s Fall 2017 issue. Now at the end of her seventh decade, Kris has more than a few high points to celebrate, among them: free-falling from 10,000 feet over Mt. Rainier, receiving a fellowship from the Library of Congress, and meeting Dizzy Gillespie. Currently, she is working on expanding her collection of rejection notices, and organizing creative, real life experiences for her four grandchildren.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public. 

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

Portland and local authors read at April WordFest

 

Tony Ardizzone reads from his prize-winning novel, The Arab’s Ox, at the next WordFest on Tuesday, April 10, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

A captivating linked-story collection set in Morocco’s gleaming imperial cities, twisting  medinas, and remote Saharan outposts, The Arab’s Ox received the Chicago Foundation for Literature Award for Fiction, a Pushcart Prize, the Lawrence Foundation Award in Fiction, and the Milkweed National Fiction Prize. The novel “weaves three distinct story lines…involving Americans hoping to distract themselves from stateside problems in the disturbing beauty of the Moroccan landscape.” (Review of Contemporary Fiction.) “Full of masterly writing and teeming with ordinary Moroccan life, this is travel literature of a high order.” (Chicago Tribune.)

 

Tony Ardizzone is the author of four other novels: The Whale Chaser, In the Garden of Papa Santuzzu, Heart of the Order, and In the Name of the Father. His short story collections include The Evening News and Taking It Home: Stories from the Neighborhood. He has been awarded two Fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and numerous literary prizes including the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction. Originally a native of Chicago, he now lives in Portland.

 

 

 

 

 

Lilly Brock is a WordFest regular. Her previous book, Wooden Boats and Iron Men, was about men who fought in World War II. Her newest book, Victory on the Home Front: While Her Husband Fought, She Built Planes ~ She was a Rosie the Riveter, focuses on the strength of women who served at home, and specifically Kelso resident Penny Dean Messinger. While interviewing Penny about her time as a “Rosie the Riveter,” Lilly also learned about her husband who was fighting overseas as a Seabee. Lilly expanded the eventual book to include both of their wartime experiences as they put their young marriage on hold to serve their country.

 

Lilly’s preferred genre is historical fiction. She has written a novel about a family in the 1850s traveling by paddle wheel steamship from New York to the Pacific Northwest via South America. She has also written and published Food Gifts Recipes from Nature’s Bountybased on organic gardening.

 

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

 

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Tale of the Ku Klux Klan in Oregon at March WordFest

Portland author Jeff Stookey reads from his novel about the Ku Klux Klan’s activities in Oregon at the next WordFest on Tuesday, March 13, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Acquaintance, the first book in his Medicine for the Blues trilogy, tells the story of Carl Holman, a surgeon who experienced the horrors of World War I, including the loss of his fellow officer and lover. Returning to Portland after the war, Carl develops a friendship with a young jazz musician named Jimmy Harper. The two men tentatively begin to explore sharing a life together. But this is Oregon in the 1920s, where the Ku Klux Klan is gaining political influence and homosexual relationships are illegal. The novel is “a deep dive into Portland’s history,” based on archival research about the lesser known story of the Klan in the
Pacific Northwest, riding the wave of anti-immigrant and anti-Catholic prejudice, and promoting the eugenics movement with its agenda to sterilize segments of the population thought to threaten Anglo-Saxon stock.

Jeff  was writing stories even as he was growing up in a small town in rural Washington State. He studied literature, history, and cinema at Occidental College, and received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater from Fort Wright College. Trained in the medical field, he worked for many years with pathologists and trauma surgeons. Jeff lives in Portland with his longtime partner.

Watch the Book Chat interview with Jeff here:

 

 

Jan Bono will be reading selections from Bottom Feeders and Starfish, the first two books in her Sylvia Avery Mystery series, set on the southwest Washington coast.

Jan has lived in Long Beach, Washington, since 1977. She began writing a humorous, personal experience newspaper column that continued for 10 years, garnering 11 state awards from the WNPA. Her column’s popularity led her to become one of the top five contributing authors to the Chicken Soup for the Soul series, publishing 36 stories during the past 8 years.

In 2012, Jan became the Grand Prize winner of the Coast Weekend serial mystery chapter contest. This inspired her to begin writing her lighthearted and fun cozy mystery series, which she describes as “like Murder She Wrote, but with a lot more humor.”

Jan has also written five collections of humorous, personal experience short stories, two poetry chapbooks, one collection of short romances, a book about her 252-pound weight-loss journey, and nine one-act plays. She has been published in numerous magazines, including Guidepost, Star, and Woman’s World.

Jan was recently featured in a front page article in The Daily News. You can read it here.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

Three poets headline February’s WordFest

Three poets celebrate friendship, memories, truth and history at the next WordFest on Tuesday, February 13, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Fellow poets, former colleagues and close friends Carolyn Norred and Deborah Brink Woehrmann will present different approaches to the idea of history.

Carolyn will read excerpts from an exchange of letters between herself and her adolescent grandson, Oliver. This epistolary conversation developed in response to his telling her that he enjoyed school but didn’t like history. Through their correspondence, they have been exploring his question, “What can I do with history?”

Carolyn is retired from Lower Columbia College’s Language and Literature Department.

Through her poetry, Deborah will be exploring the question of truth and the stories we tell ourselves in the making of “history”.

Deborah was also an instructor at LCC in the Department of Language and Literature for ten years while co-hosting the Northwest Voices Series. She now lives in Portland, where she writes, works as a massage therapist, and leads the occasional writing workshop. You can read her musings and articles (along with guest-writers) at Live(s) Inspiring Today! at www.l-i-t.org

 

Joining Carolyn and Deborah will be Longview poet and memoirist Mary Lyons. She will read from her developing anthology entitled Body Parts. Her Valentine’s Day selection, “An Affair of The Heart,” sheds light on the funny and bizarre experiences of modern technology intersecting with our hearts. Her second selection, “Clowning around,” takes on new meaning as a Halloween adventure unfolds.

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

 

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WordFest greets the New Year with three local writers

WordFest kicks off its 2018 series on Tuesday, January 9, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Fred Hudgins will read from his first young adult (YA) novel, Green Grass. He says, “I’m sure you’ve heard the cliché about the grass always being greener on the other side of the fence. It’s usually a little more complicated than that.”

Susannah and her friends open a portal to a magical Paradise. But Paradise isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. The young people drop into the middle of a civil war, with good people and bad people on both sides. Deciding who is who becomes a pretty important question to figure out. Once the Earthlings get cloned, things really become complicated. Imagine saying “Hi!” to yourself!

Fred has been writing poetry and short stories since he took a Creative Writing class at Purdue University in 1967. “Unfortunately, that was the only class I passed.” He spent the next three years in the army, including a tour in Vietnam, then earned a BS in Computer Science from Rutgers, with a career as a computer programmer.

His short stories and poems have been published in Biker MagazineThe Salal Review, The Scribbler, in the anthologies, That Holiday Feeling and Not Your Mother’s Book on Working for a Living, and on Poetry.Com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ryan O’Keefe will be reading an excerpt from his novel Shallow World: A Sunny-Thorned Seed for the Untold Stories, which he describes as “a New Adult romantic dramedy.” Set in the fictional city of Merson Valley, California, it follows the wonderful, messy, sometimes heartbreaking lives of best friends Jynnete and Katy, both 20, as they face the challenges and adventures of college, romance, new adulthood, and a school shooting.

Ryan is currently seeking ways to get his novel published.  Born in Washington, he has also lived in Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and California, and moved to Longview in September. He previously worked as a copywriter for a financial institution.

 

 

 

Joan Enders will read from Evidence is Lacking. Yet I Still Hope. Joshua Henry Bates was a young teacher in a country school when he signed up for service in the American Expeditionary Forces going to Europe in the “war to end all wars.” The book contains primary sources about Joshua and his life–about the young woman with whom he fell in love, about leaving his farm to  attend the University of Utah, and his self-doubts reflected in his journal. Joan will lead the audience in an “interactive reading” of these sources, including documents and photographs from his youth,  his journal and Camp Lewis diary, and a variety of other materials to learn about who he was and what happened to him. Joan promises it will be “very different from other readings, to be sure!”

 

Joan taught literature and research skills in middle and high school libraries for 28 years. She was a recipient of the American Library Association’s Frances Henne Award for library leadership. She now conducts training webinars for librarians and administers the local Family History Center for Family Search International. She enjoys “peeling the research onion” for students and adults. Joan speaks to professional organizations and at genealogy conferences.

 

 

 

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

Bigfoot walks at November WordFest

WordFest will feature accounts and stories about Bigfoot on Tuesday, November 14, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

Popular naturalist and writer Robert Michael Pyle will read from his book, Where Bigfoot Walks: Crossing the Dark Divide. First published in 1995, the book has been recently re-issued with a new chapter examining evidence that suggests such a creature may exist. Awarded a Guggenheim fellowship to investigate the legends of Sasquatch, Bob trekked into the unprotected wilderness of the Dark Divide near Mount St. Helens where he discovered a giant fossil footprint and more recent tracks. He interviewed Indians who told him of an outcast tribe, the Seeahtiks, who had not fully evolved into humans, and met scientists, hunters, and others who have devoted their lives to the search. The result is a moving and witty narrative investigation of not only the phenomenon of Bigfoot, but also of the human need to believe that something is out there beyond the campfire.

Bob​ is the author of eighteen books, including Wintergreen, Rambles in a Ravaged Land, Chasing Monarchs, Sky Time in Grays River: Living for Keeps in a Forgotten Place, and a poetry collection Evolution of the Genus Iris. A Yale-trained ecologist and Guggenheim fellow, he is a full-time writer living in Wahkiakum County.

You can watch an interview with Robert Michael Pyle about Bigfoot on BookChat.

 

 

 

Captain H.J. “Pete” Pettersen will read from his novel, Port Orford’s Youngest Fisherman, the story of a young boy who goes to live with his grandfather following the death of his parents and learns the art of fishing. Living in a fisherman’s shack in the little coastal village of Port Orford, Oregon, the boy works through his grief, finding a new home and a new life.

 

 

Pete has spent most of his life at sea. Raised in the San Juan Islands, he was commercially fishing with his dad and brothers on the Pacific coast and in Alaskan waters by the time he was eight, and was captaining a fishing boat in Alaska at the age of thirteen. After obtaining his Captain Oceans license, he worked and traveled the world. Recently retired, he and his wife Kat live in Longview.

 

 

 

 

 

William Alton will be reading from a novel he is co-writing with John Saxon, titled A Change in the Wind. Set in Central Europe at the beginning of the 19th Century as Napoleon is building his empire, it chronicles a spiritual battle spreading across the quiet villages and bustling cities of the Germanies. Räder Wunderwahn, a young man with a past he cannot remember, is searching for his identity, which is tied to the darkness rising where the old gods are intent on conquering the world and establishing a new Reich.

Bill was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2010. He has written a collection of flash fiction, Girls, two collections of poetry, Heroes of Silence and Heat Washes Through, a memoir titled My Name is Bill and a novel, Flesh and Bone. He earned an MFA in Creative Writing from Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon.

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

October WordFest offers war, murder and romance next Tuesday

WordFest will feature stories about love between concert pianists, World War II from a German soldier’s perspective, and murder with questions of  justice, next Tuesday, October 10, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse, 1333 Broadway in Longview.

 

Laura Baird will be reading from her debut romance novel, Keyed Up:

As pianist with the Seattle Symphony, Penelope Dixon is unexpectedly reunited with Sebastian Mauer, her first love from ten years earlier. Sebastian, once a famed performer, had foolishly pushed aside his love for Penelope, thinking it for the best at the time. Now a reclusive composer, he’s wants to prove they deserve a second chance together, and Penelope is forced to face her buried desires and the impact of those desires on her career.

 

 

A dental hygienist for more than seventeen years, Laura has been writing steadily during that time, resulting in three of her stories recently being accepted by three different publishers.  Copies of Keyed Up will be available for purchase at WordFest. Second Time Love (Evernight Publishing) and Resort Virgins (Wild Rose Press) will be appearing in six to nine months.

 

 

 

 

 

Philip Brock will be reading from his novel, Silk Cocoon, set during World War II:  With a beautiful wife and child and a successful business, Hans Schultz is living an almost idyllic life in pre-war Germany. He believes the future is bright and promising under the new Nazi government with its vision of Germany becoming a world leader once again. But with the onset of war, his world spins out of his control. He’s called to military service in the infantry and, as the war progresses, begins to question the actions of his government. When he witnesses the slaughter of men, women and children at the Plunda Work Camp, Hans realizes the country is run by monsters. Eventually, he will have to answer for the part he was forced to play in these atrocities.

Philip, a 1972 graduate of Saint Martin’s University in Lacey, Washington, worked for more than 30 years as a Certified Public Accountant. Now retired, he lives in Cathlamet, Washington, on the shores of the Columbia River. His interest in Nazi Germany began as a child living in Wurtzburg, Germany. He remembers lying in bed, watching the morning sunlight streaming through a bullet hole in the window shutter, playing in a back yard still pock-marked from exploding shells, and finding his landlord’s garden shed filled with Nazi uniforms, flags and other memorabilia.

 

 

Kevin Hunter is president of the Longview Downtowner’s business group and an international video broadcaster and podcaster. As host of The Business Forum Show, he produces content seen and heard in 220 countries and territories around the world. He will be reading from a book he wrote with his wife, Stephanie, titled Justice was Served.

Though fiction, the story is based on a true event about a young nurse who disappeared from a hospital parking ramp after finishing her shift. The investigation into her disappearance bogs down in the dead of winter, but in the following spring, her body is discovered with the melting snow. As the perpetrator is awaiting his trial, some people think that three meals a day, cable TV, and a warm jail cell isn’t really justice for snuffing out the life of young vibrant woman. The FBI say the case may be compromised. What if he is set free? How will they know that justice was served?

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

WordFest launches fall season on Tuesday

Local judge and storyteller Ed Putka will kick off WordFest’s fall season next Tuesday, September 12, 6:00 pm, at the Cassava Coffeehouse.

A WordFest favorite, Ed has been compared to Garrison Keillor for his popular Cleveland stories, set in the Polish neighborhood of his youth. Once again combining memory and humor, Ed will share another tale of how the old gang helped the new kid with the all-time worst name get through school.

 

 

 

 

Steve Anderson will read excerpts from the third in his Book of Hours trilogy. The resplendent fifteenth century Book of Hours has been restored and presented to Pope Gregory XVII, but what will happen to the ancient shreds of parchment that Brother Alphaios and archivist Inaki Arriagi found within its covers?

 

 

 

 

The parchment holds a deep secret that undercuts one of the very pillars of Catholicism. Will Alphaios be able to continue a monastic life or be driven from it for his disobedience?

Steve lives and writes in Longview.

 

 

 

Alan Rose will read from his recently completed novel, As If Death Summoned, about the AIDS epidemic. Alan was involved in the epidemic, first in Australia in the 1980s, and then working at Cascade AIDS Project in Portland through the 1990s.

 

 

 

 

Alan has written two earlier novels, The Legacy of Emily Hargraves, a paranormal mystery, and Tales of Tokyo, a quest novel set in modern day Japan, as well as a novella, The Unforgiven, a psychological mystery published by Bold Strokes Books in 2012.

 

 

 

There will be an open mic period following the presentations.

 

The monthly gathering of readers and writers meets the second Tuesday of each month, 6:00-8:00 PM, at Cassava, 1333 Broadway in Longview. The events are free and open to the public.

Cassava offers a dinner menu for those who wish to enjoy a meal with the readings, as well as local wines and brews.